Country songs dating my daughter

Auld one: (old one) wife; Auld lad: (old lad) husband; Uncle: some versions use "Young Kill" The music to Heart of Oak was by Dr. The English words were written by the famous actor David Garrick (1716-1779) in 1759.

Garrick is also credited with the theatrical blessing, "Break a Leg" as he was reportedly so involved in his performance of Richard III that he did not notice the pain of a fracture he incurred.

According to one source the tune is an older air whose origin is unkown.

Of a richer tradition was the regimental music played by the pipes and drums that accompanied the soldiers.

Another theory is that the tune originated in 1758 when Admirals Hawke and Rodney were watching the French fleet off the coast.

Research has shown that the tune was sung in America as early as 1650 and was a traditional fife tune, imported from England as Version 1 I'm lonesome since I crossed the hill, And o'er the moorland sedgy Such heavy thoughts my heart do fill, Since parting with my Betsey I seek for one as fair and gay, But find none to remind me How sweet the hours I passed away, With the girl I left behind me.

O ne'er shall I foget the night, the stars were bright above me And gently lent their silv'ry light when first she vowed to love me But now I'm bound to Brighton camp kind heaven then pray guide me And send me safely back again, to the girl I left behind me Her golden hair in ringlets fair, Her eyes like diamonds shining Her slender waist, her heavenly face, that leaves my heart still pining Ye gods above oh hear my prayer to my beauteous fair to find me And send me safely back again, to the girl I left behind me The bee shall honey taste no more, the dove become a ranger The falling waters cease to roar, ere I shall seek to change her The vows we made to heav'n above shall ever cheer and bind me In constancy to her I love, the girl I left behind me.

Version 2 The hours sad I left a maid A lingering farewell taking Whose sighs and tears my steps delayed I thought her heart was breaking In hurried words her name I blest I breathed the vows that bind me And to my heart in anguish pressed The girl I left behind me Then to the east we bore away To win a name in story And there where dawns the sun of day There dawned our sun of glory The place in my sight When in the host assigned me I shared the glory of that fight Sweet girl I left behind me Though many a name our banner bore Of former deeds of daring But they were of the day of yore In which we had no sharing But now our laurels freshly won With the old one shall entwine me Singing worthy of our size each son Sweet girl I left behind me The hope of final victory Within my bosom burning Is mingling with sweet thoughts of thee And of my fond returning But should I n'eer return again Still with thy love i'll bind me Dishonors breath shall never stain The name I leave behind me Waxie's Dargle Says my auld one to your auld one Will you come to the Waxie's dargle Says your auld one to my auld one Sure I haven't got a farthing I've just been down to Monto town To see Uncle Mc Ardle But he wouldn't lend me a half a crown To go to the Waxie's dargle Chorus: What'll you have, will you have a pint Yes, I'll have a pint with you, sir And if one of us doesn't order soon We'll be thrown out of the boozer Says my auld one to your auld one Will you come to the Galway races Says your auld one to my auld one With the price of my auld lad's braces I went down to Capel Street To the pawn shop money lenders But they wouldn't give me a couple of bob On my auld lad's red suspenders Chorus: What'll you have, will you have a pint Yes, I'll have a pint with you, sir And if one of us doesn't order soon We'll be thrown out of the boozer Says my auld one to your auld one We've got no beef nor mutton But if we go down to Monto town We might get a drink for nothin' Here's a piece of good advice I got from an auld fish-monger When food is scarce and you see the hearse You'll know you've died of hunger Chorus: What'll you have, will you have a pint Yes, I'll have a pint with you, sir And if one of us doesn't order soon We'll be thrown out of the boozer Waxies were candlemakers, traditionally women.

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